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How Many Misadventures May Be Ahead Before They Become Safe?

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-21/tasmanian-bernard-gore-stairwell-death-coronial/13002014

https://www.news.com.au/national/nsw-act/courts-law/inquest-begins-into-mans-lonely-death-inside-a-westfield-bondi-junction-stairwell/news-story/1f35db0a8a78cb324bf36a83bdf64e64

The coroner ruled that Mr. Gore’s lonely death resulted from misadventure, though a ‘Grey Code’ call that would trigger a full in-mall search may have saved his life. 

The question is, how many misadventures may be ahead for someone else before the stairwells become safe for all?

The answer is YES, and it is unsophisticated, cost-effective, and commercially scalable. 

The idea is to use the emergency light to report the automatic dispatchable location of the distressed persons inside multi-level buildings.

The exit sign emergency light can capture Mr. Gore’s movement and relay that data to the security room, wherein the security officer can respond to save Mr. Gore’s life. 

If Mr. Gore had a phone or wearable device with him, the emergency light could respond to his SOS for help with his accurate location too.

The emergency light we use today has come a long way. The first emergency lighting system originated from the Han dynasty of China in 206 BCE when soldiers on the Great wall used fire signals to relay physical messages, such as alerting for a sudden attack by the invading Huns, indicating the attackers’ whereabouts as referenced to the wall. 

The first modern emergency light evolved after 1802 when Humphry Davy invented the first electric light. The conventional emergency light used inside the buildings is virtually a dummy lightbulb that lights up its coupled exit signage to indicate the way out. 

Such an emergency lighting system does not even fulfill the thousands of years old invention. It neither relays SOS messaging nor indicates the distressed persons’ position in an emergency, especially in a multi-story complex. It only directs all occupants to make their way out of the buildings. That is a shame.

The time has come to use up-to-date technology to improve the dummy emergency light for helping distressed persons like Mr. Gore. 

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